sandy hook

Elon Musk’s Lawyer Faces Possible Sanctions Over Deposition Behavior

  • Alex Spiro faces potential sanctions over his behavior during Elon Musk’s deposition.
  • An opposing lawyer accused Spiro, Musk’s go-to attorney, of acting “astonishingly unprofessional.”
  • The deposition is part of a lawsuit accusing Musk of falsely linking a man to a neo-Nazi group.

Alex Spiro, Elon Musk’s personal attorney, could be sanctioned over his conduct during a recent deposition with the billionaire — if the lawyer facing off against him in a legal battle gets his way.

Musk was deposed last month for a lawsuit against the X owner that alleges Musk boosted a conspiracy theory that falsely affiliated 22-year-old Ben Brody with a neo-Nazi group.

In a court filing from Monday, Brody’s lawyer, Mark Bankston — who famously represented the parents of a Sandy Hook victim and won a $45 million defamation case against Alex Jones — argued that Spiro had demonstrated “astonishingly unprofessional” behavior and “seriously overstepped his bounds” during the deposition, Bloomberg first reported.

Spiro repeatedly cut off Bankston’s line of questioning and attempted to make fun of Bankston, the lawyer wrote in his sanctions motion, according to Bloomberg.

Spiro pushed back on the motion in an emailed comment to Business Insider.

“This is amateur hour,” Spiro told BI. “I understand this lawyer wants his 15 minutes of fame, but these shakedown tactics won’t work.”

In the motion, Bankston claims Spiro was the only defense attorney present at the deposition even though he’s not authorized to practice law in Texas, according to Bloomberg’s report. The motion indicated that in the Texas case, two other lawyers who are permitted to practice in the state have also represented Musk, the publication said. Spiro is a partner at the New

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CT lawyer who won $1B Alex Jones verdict talks Sandy Hook trial

WESTPORT — In October, almost ten years after the Sandy Hook school shooting, eight families of the victims and one FBI agent received $965 million in a defamation case against Alex Jonesone of the largest damages awards in history — and a lawyer from Westport played a key part in it.

On Jan. 19, the Y’s Men of Westport hosted a talk with Attorney Josh Koskoff, a longtime Westporter and Staples grad, who represented the families in this trial, as well as a case against Remingtonthe manufacturer of the gun used in shooting.

Koskoff opened with a quote from the Bible, where God casts Satan from heaven: “By the multitude of thy merchandise they have filled the midst of thee with violence, and thou hast sinned: therefore I will cast thee as profane out of the mountain of God: and I will destroy thee, O covering cherub, from the midst of the stones of fire.”

“And merchandise is what Alex Emerick Jones is all about,” Koskoff said.

For years, Jones used social media platforms, his own website, InfoWars, and his radio show, “The Alex Jones Show,” to spread misinformation about the shooting that killed 20 students and six educators. Some instances include calling the shooting a “hoax” that was staged by “crisis actors.”

He listed examples of merchandise Jones has promoted, including supplements and iodine, which helped fund his programs.

“Jones takes from the playbook from other figures, notably cult leaders, terrorists and autocrats,” Koskoff said. “His major message is that the world is filled with global and corporate elites and media elites that are coming to enslave you, take away your guns and depopulate you.”

Koskoff said that they had to convince the jury that there were people who believed Jones’ rhetoric.

“The truth is, you have

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Suspend Alex Jones’ lawyer in Sandy Hook records leak

“The (American Bar Association) guidelines provide that the initial factor in determining discipline is the amount of the actual or potential injury caused by the lawyer’s misconduct,” said Brian Staines, Connecticut’s chief disciplinary counsel, in a court document. “In this case the potential injury would have been devastating.”

Staines is referring to allegations that Pattis improperly shared highly confidential medical records of eight Sandy Hook families and an FBI agent who won $1.4 billion in defamation damages against Jones late last year. Pattis sent the restricted records to Jones’ then-bankruptcy attorney in Texas during the August defamation awards trial for parents of a other boy Sandy Hook who Jones defamed. The bankruptcy attorney then transferred the restricted medical records to Jones’ defense attorney in the Texas case, who inadvertently sent the records to the lawyer for the parents.

The result was an explosive announcement that made national headlines during the livestreamed Texas trial when the attorney for the Sandy Hook parents who was questioning Jones on the stand revealed he had Jones’ cellphone calls and the protected medical records of the Sandy Hook families from the Connecticut case.

Andino Reynal, Jones’ defense attorney in Texas, called the bombshell disclosure, “the worst day of my legal career.” Staines has recommended Reynal be suspended from practicing law in Connecticut for three months for Reynal’s role in the alleged misconduct.

For Reynal, who doesn’t practice law in Connecticut, the threat of suspension is not as consequential as it is for Pattis, one of the state’s highest-profile defense attorneys, who said he is at a crossroads after the contentious Jones Sandy Hook trial in Connecticut.

State Superior Court Judge Barbara Bellis has scheduled a disciplinary hearing for Pattis and Reynal on Jan. 13. It is unclear whether that date will conflict

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After Alex Jones’ trial, contentious CT lawyer is at a crossroads

NEW HAVEN — When Norm Pattis told jurors at the close of the Sandy Hook defamation trial in Waterbury that there was no place he’d rather be than before them defending Alex Jones, Pattis meant it — even if Jones himself was boycotting the case 1,800 miles away in Texas.

Pattis might have clarified what he meant by sharing with jurors the truth underlying Pattis’ 30-year career as a criminal defense lawyer — that by zealously defending a man so widely reviled as Jones, Pattis found healing for the pain that has been with Pattis since he was a first grader.

“I was scorned, and when my mother was shopping around with other men, I was an unwelcome presence in my own home — I know what that’s like,” Pattis said during an interview in his Orange Street office last week. “I know what it’s like to walk into a room and be hated for who you are, and somehow it’s important to me to stand next to that person — and there is nothing I would rather do than that.”

But there was another truth bubbling beneath Pattis’ closing argument to the jury that wound up delivering a $965 million judgment against Jones for eight Sandy Hook families and an FBI agent Jones defamed. The livestreamed four-week trial was so stressful and anxiety-ridden for Pattis and his wife that it bought him to a crossroads — where he must decide whether he’ll continue to delight in high-profile trial fights or live a family life in Vermont of reading, writing and perhaps broadcasting.

For one of Connecticut’s most prominent criminal defense attorneys after losing one of the highest profile lawsuits of its kind in the country, Pattis finds himself not only at a crossroads but at place of gratitude in

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Alex Jones lawyer takes the Fifth during Sandy Hook hearing

WATERBURY, Conn. (AP) — A lawyer for conspiracy theorist Alex Jones invoked his right against self-incrimination Thursday during a civil court hearing in Connecticut over the possible improper disclosure of confidential medical records of relatives of some of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victims.

New Haven-based attorney Norman Pattis refused to answer questions citing his Fifth Amendment rights during a hearing on whether he should be disciplined for giving the confidential records to unauthorized persons — other lawyers for Jones in Texas. He has denied any wrongdoing. A judge did not decide Thursday if any discipline is warranted.

The hearing was connected to a Connecticut lawsuit filed by Sandy Hook families against Jones for calling the 2012 shooting that killed 20 children and six educators in Newtown a hoax. State Judge Barabara Bellis in Waterbury found Jones liable for damages in November 2021 and a jury trial over how much he should pay is scheduled to begin next month.

Bellis, who oversaw Thursday’s hearing, said it was “unusual” for a lawyer to invoke the Fifth Amendment during a disciplinary hearing.

One of Jones’s Texas-based lawyers, Andino Reynal, also tested before Bellis on Thursday as he also faces possible discipline over the records disclosure. Reynal said he was surprised and embarrassed when he found out about the disclosure.

“It was the worst day of my legal career,” he said.

Reynal represented Jones during a trial in Austin, Texas — where Jones and his Infowars web show are based — in a similar lawsuit over his claims the school shooting was a hoax. That trial ended earlier this month when a jury awarded the parents of one of the children killed in the massacre nearly $50 million in damages. Reynal has said Jones will appeal the verdicts.

According to court documents

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Alex Jones’ lawyer on Sandy Hook leak: ‘Worst day’ of career

WATERBURY — The attorney who ran Alex Jones’ defense in the Sandy Hook defamation trial in Texas testified in a disciplinary hearing Thursday that he was shocked to learn his office had leaked confidential medical records of grieving families that were protected by a court order.

“It was the worst day of my legal career,” said Andino Reynal, Jones’ lead attorney in Texas, testifying on Thursday in state Superior Court in Waterbury how he reacted when he found out during the Texas trial that medical records from a Sandy Hook defamation case in Connecticut had been sent by his office to the lawyers for two parents who won a defamation case against Jones in Texas. “I was surprised by it in court…and I immediately looked for a way to claw the information back.”

Reynal’s admission on Thursday that he was “very, very worried about what happened” was in contrast to the stoic testimony of New Haven defense attorney Norm Pattis, who is running Jones’ defense in a Connecticut defamation awards trial set to begin on Sept. 13. Pattis refused to answer questions on the witness stand about his role in the leak, citing his rights under the Fifth Amendment 25 times.

State Superior Court Judge Barbara Bellis, who suspended jury selection Thursday and Friday in the upcoming Connecticut trial specifically to decide whether to discipline Reynal and Pattisgave both sides 10 days to make arguments about the implications of Pattis refusing to answer questions in his own disciplinary hearing.

What that means for a speedy ruling from Bellis on the discipline question remains to be seen, except to say the judge ordered closing arguments for Sept. 2.

During a hearing on the same discipline question last weekChris Mattei, the lead attorney for an FBI agent and eight

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Alex Jones’ lawyer takes the Fifth during Sandy Hook hearing

WATERBURY, Conn. — A lawyer for conspiracy theorist Alex Jones invoked his right against self-incrimination Thursday during a civil court hearing in Connecticut over the possible improper disclosure of confidential medical records of relatives of some of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victims.

New Haven-based attorney Norman Pattis refused to answer questions citing his Fifth Amendment rights during a hearing on whether he should be disciplined for giving the confidential records to unauthorized persons — other lawyers for Jones in Texas. He has denied any wrongdoing. A judge did not decide Thursday if any discipline is warranted.

The hearing was connected to a Connecticut lawsuit filed by Sandy Hook families against Jones for calling the 2012 shooting that killed 20 children and six educators in Newtown a hoax. State Judge Barabara Bellis in Waterbury found Jones liable for damages in November 2021 and a jury trial over how much he should pay is scheduled to begin next month.

Bellis, who oversaw Thursday’s hearing, said it was “unusual” for a lawyer to invoke the Fifth Amendment during a disciplinary hearing.

One of Jones’s Texas-based lawyers, Andino Reynal, also tested before Bellis on Thursday as he also faces possible discipline over the records disclosure. Reynal said he was surprised and embarrassed when he found out about the disclosure.

“It was the worst day of my legal career,” he said.

Reynal represented Jones during a trial in Austin, Texas — where Jones and his Infowars web show are based — in a similar lawsuit over his claims the school shooting was a hoax. That trial ended earlier this month when a jury awarded the parents of one of the children killed in the massacre nearly $50 million in damages. Reynal has said Jones will appeal the verdicts.

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According to

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Alex Jones’ CT attorney facing punishment in Sandy Hook trial

NEWTOWN — A judge will decide Wednesday whether to judge-gravely-concerned-Alex-Jones-17365178.php”punish one of Connecticut’s highest-profile defense attorneys over allegations that he shared with other lawyers protected medical records of grieving Sandy Hook families who won a defamation case against Alex Jones.

Norm Pattis, a New Haven attorney who is running Jones’ defense in Connecticut, got into trouble this month when state Superior Court Judge Barbara Bellis learned about the possible confidentiality breach from news reports out of the explosive second week of Jones’ trial in Texas, where a jury ordered Jones to pay two Sandy Hook parents $49 million in defamation damages.

Pattis, who says he’s done nothing to deserve discipline or sanctions by sharing pretrial information with Jones’ lead attorney in Texas, argued in court papers, “any misconduct is vehemently denied here as Mr. Pattis’ conduct fell directly within the permissible conduct under a careful reading of the confidentiality order.”

Specifically, Pattis wanted Bellis to dismiss her inquiry because Jones’ parent company has filed for bankruptcy protection and therefore has stalled a Sept. 6 trial in Waterbury to see how much Jones must pay an FBI agent and eight Sandy Hook families he defamed.

No, Bellis responded on Monday.

“While (this is) … presently pending in the bankruptcy courts, this disciplinary matter is directed to (lawyers) and not the parties, such that the court has jurisdiction to address the disciplinary issues,” Bellis ruled.

The Wednesday showdown between Bellis and Pattis is the latest drama in a story that captured nationwide headlines early this month, when Jones as the face of American conspiracy culture and two parents of a slain Sandy Hook boy as the face of American families of loss confronted each other face to face for the first time in a Texas courtroom.

“Do you think I’m

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Alex Jones texted nude photo of his wife to Roger Stone

Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones sent conservative political operative and former Donald Trump adviser Roger Stone an “intimate photo” of his wife, the attorney representing families of Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre victims revealed, noting that he is element whether she gave consent to send the picture .

The alleged photo was mistakenly included in a cache of text messages and emails sent to the legal team that successfully sued Jones for defamation earlier this month, attorney Mark Bankston, the recipient of the leak, said on the progressive news commentary show the Young Turks this week.

In case you missed it: Alex Jones’ cellphone records mistakenly shared by attorney with Sandy Hook legal team, lawyer says

Bankston said he was concerned that Jones’ wife, Erika Wulff Jones, didn’t give her husband permission to send the photograph.

“I don’t know if it was consensual,” said Bankston, who recently won nearly $50 million in damages for the parents of a child killed in the 2012 school shooting, which for years Jones called a hoax.

“And if it wasn’t consensual, Mrs. Wulff-Jones should know about that, and there might be something that needs to be done about that,” Bankston said in the interview.

Mark Bankston, lawyer for Neil Heslin and Scarlett Lewis, asks Alex Jones questions about text messages during a trial at the Travis County Courthouse in Austin on Wednesday Aug.  3, 2022.

Mark Bankston, lawyer for Neil Heslin and Scarlett Lewis, asks Alex Jones questions about text messages during a trial at the Travis County Courthouse in Austin on Wednesday Aug. 3, 2022.

Briana Sanchez/Associated Press

Wulff-Jones told Insider on Tuesday that she was “unaware” her husband sent a nude photograph of her to Stone. She appeared uninterested in pursuing charges against her husband, Insider reported.

“I am upset that he took (the) privilege to send the image to someone without my knowledge,” Wulff-Jones, who married Jones in 2017, told Insider.

She added: “Honestly, I was unaware that this occurred. I’m

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CT judge ‘gravely concerned’ about leak in Alex Jones case

A Connecticut judge said on Wednesday that she was “gravely concerned” over the possible release of private medical records of several Sandy Hook family members by attorneys representing the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones.

Superior Court Judge Barbara Bellis of Waterbury ordered Norm Pattis, one of Jones’ many attorneys, to explain how, exactly, those medical records wound up in the hands of Jones’ attorney in Texas. Pattis is expected to explain what happened during a hearing that will likely take place next week, amid a series of lawsuits pitting Jones against the families he repeatedly defamed by claiming that the Sandy Hook massacre was a “hoax.”

Pattis must also explain what actions he and other attorneys representing Jones in his hometown of Austin took to protect the confidentiality of the records of several of the plaintiffs who are suing Jones, Bellis said.

The possibility that those records had been mishandled was revealed last week, when an attorney representing two Sandy Hook parents stunned a Texas courtroom by announcing that Jones’ attorneys had mistakenly sent a cache of documents to him that included medical records and the entire contents of Jones’ cellphone.

“I am clearly gravely concerned about what I have to hear in headlines on the news,” Bellis said during a remote hearing to discuss the matter on Wednesday. “It was never reported to me by counsel that there were any issues, but just what I read in the news.”

Pattis, a New Haven attorney, did not immediately respond to requests for comment on Wednesday following the hearing, where he was represented by attorney Wesley Mead.

Mead requested that any future hearings be held privately to protect Pattis from potential damage to his “reputation and character,” but Judge Bellis denied that request.

The hearing nominally occurred as part of a

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