san luis

Arizona Attorney General’s Office asks FBI, IRS to investigate group behind ‘2000 Mules’

Catherine Engelbrecht.

Catherine Engelbrecht.

Republican candidates for top statewide offices in Arizona have said they believe what they saw in the election-conspiracy movie “2000 Mules.”

Now, the state Attorney General’s Office is asking the FBI and IRS for investigations of the group behind the movie, True the Vote, noting that it has repeatedly rebuffed all requests to share the documentary’s alleged evidence and has raised “considerable sums of money” based on claims of having that evidence.

“Given TTV’s status as a nonprofit organization, it would appear that further review of its financials may be warranted,” wrote Reginald “Reggie” Grigsby, chief special agent of the office’s Special Investigations Section.

The film, released in May and thoroughly debunked by experts and media organizations, claims mobile-phone data obtained by the group shows a coordinated effort by hundreds of people around the country — deemed “mules” — to stuff election drop boxes with ballots for candidate Joe Biden in 2020. True the Vote’s representatives said they would use their findings to make elections more secure.

But the moviemakers have since refused to release any of their supposed data to law enforcement groups even after promising to do so, the Attorney General’s Office said in the two-page letter Friday.

Grigsby’s letter accuses True the Vote founder Catherine Engelbrecht and its contractor Gregg Phillips of providing misleading information to his office and other law enforcement groups. He also mentions some of the bogus information the group has previously put out related to the movie, such as the false claims that the group helped solve a murder in Atlanta and break a ballot-harvesting case in San Luis, Arizona.

In sum, the information points to “potential violations” of tax code given True the Vote’s 501(c)3 nonprofit status, the letter states.

True the Vote didn’t respond to an email Friday from

Read the rest

Former Arizona major faces sentencing in ballot harvesting case, lawyer asks for leniency

The lawyer for an Arizona woman and the former major of San Luis who pleaded guilty to ballot abuse is asking a judge for leniency in sentencing her.

Guillermina Fuentes, 66, pleaded guilty to one count of ballot abuse on June 2 and admitted to collecting four early voting ballots during the 2020 election and then giving them to Alma Juarez, who dropped them off at a polling place.

Juarez also pleaded guilty to ballot abuse, but entered an agreement with prosecutors in exchange for probation.

Prosecutors in the case are asking Yuma County Superior Court Judge Roger Nelson to hand Fuentes a sentence of one year, but her lawyers argue that any time in prison would be a miscarriage of justice.

AHEAD OF ARIZONA AND NEVADA RALLIES, TRUMP SUPER PAC LAUNCHES ADS IN EACH STATE TYING DEMOCRATS TO BIDEN

Guillermina Fuentes, 66, pleaded guilty to one count of ballot abuse and admitted to collecting four early voting ballots during the 2020 election and then giving them to Alma Juarez, who dropped them off at a polling place.

Guillermina Fuentes, 66, pleaded guilty to one count of ballot abuse and admitted to collecting four early voting ballots during the 2020 election and then giving them to Alma Juarez, who dropped them off at a polling place.
(Arizona Attorney General’s Office)

“She entered a plea of ​​guilty to ballot abuse — that is, delivering four lawfully voted, signature-verified ballots,” Anne Chapman, Fuentes’ lawyer, said. “The rest of the allegations against Ms. Fuentes are untrue, unfounded, untested and largely made-up by election-denying political opponents who have a political ax to grind.”

Fuentes was formerly the San Luis major and is a member of a school board.

Several people who tested in court on Thursday said that any time in prison for Fuentes wouldn’t make sense, and it would harm the community.

Defense mitigation expert Sherri Castillo said that she interviewed people in Fuentes’ community, as well as Fuentes, and said that she’s extremely involved and volunteers regularly.

“She puts me

Read the rest