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Sentence ‘Dismissed’ For 10-Year-Old Arrested For Peeing In Parking Lot: Lawyer


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10-Year-Old Arrested for Peeing In Parking Lot Sentenced, Mom Says It’s Not ‘Right’ or ‘Fair’

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Carlee Russell’s Lawyer Confirms ‘There Was No Kidnapping’ in New Statement

Carlee Russell, the 26-year-old Alabama woman believed to have gone missing while driving home from work, has officially shared her side of the story.

Russell’s attorney Emory Anthony provided a statement on her behalf to Hoover Police Chief Nick Derzis to read during a July 24 press conference.

“There was no kidnapping on Thursday, July 13, 2023,” the lawyer said. “My client did not see a baby on the side of the road. My client did not leave the Hoover area when she was identified as a missing person.”

Russell’s attorney also clarified that she didn’t have “any help” during the incident.

“This was a single act done by herself,” the statement continued. “My client was not with anyone or any hotel with anyone from the time she was missing. My client apologizes for her actions to this community, the volunteers who were searching for her, to the Hoover Police department and other agencies as well, [and] to her friends and family.”

“We ask for your prayers for Carlee as she addresses her issues and attempts to move forward, understanding that she made a mistake in this matter. Carlee again asks for your forgiveness and prayers,” the attorney’s note concluded.

As Parade previously reported, Russell called 911 on July 13, alleging that she’d seen a toddler walking on the highway. The woman then called a family member to share the same encounter. When police arrived, they found Russell’s car and belongings but no trace of her or the child. Russell returned home on foot around 10:45 p.m. on July 15 following a 49-hour search into her disappearance, per police.

In an earlier press conference held on Thursday, July 19, Hoover Police Department chief Nicholas Derzis revealed that Russell’s search history on her cell phone included queries like “do

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Alabama woman Carlee Russell acted alone, lawyer says: ‘There was no kidnapping’

Carlee Russell, the 25-year-old Alabama woman whose reported kidnapping led to a nationwide search, has revealed that her abduction was a hoax.

During a press conference on July 24, her lawyer, Emory Anthony, said the nursing student submitted a statement to the Hoover Police Department recanting her previous story about witnessing a toddler wandering on the side of a highway and being kidnapped.

“There was no kidnapping on Thursday, July 13, 2023,” Hoover Police Chief Nicholas C. Derzis said, reading the statement. “My client did not see a baby on the side of the road. My client did not leave the Hoover area when she was identified as a missing person. My client did not have any help in this incident, but this was a single act done by herself.”

Russell apologized to her community, the volunteers, the Hoover Police Department and other agencies that assisted in search efforts to locate her.

Carlee Russell  (TODAY)

Carlee Russell (TODAY)

“As for her friends and family, we ask for your prayers for Carlee as she addresses her issues and attempts to move forward, understanding that she made a mistake in this matter. Carlee, again, asks for your forgiveness and prayers,” the statement concluded.

Derzis said that authorities are speaking with the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office about “possible criminal charges related to this case” and police will provide another update “when and if they are filed.” The department also plans to meet with Anthony about the case.

The police chief shared that Russell was supposed to be interviewed by the police with Anthony on July 24, but the statement was sent instead.

Russell’s admission comes a few days after police said they were “unable to verify” most of the information she had shared with them about the kidnapping and that there was “no reason

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Latino teens prepare cases for their future at summer ‘Lawyer Camp’ in St. Paul

On a recent Tuesday afternoon, 17 rising ninth-graders embarked on a field trip for summer camp. But instead of going to a park or zoo, these kids headed to a lesser-known spot for summer fun: the St. Paul Police Department headquarters. It was their first day of Latino Lawyer Camp, and the kids appeared eager to discover the legal system in action.

The camp aims to introduce different aspects of the legal profession to Latino kids before they start high school — and also show what the path to becoming a lawyer could look like.

Enrique Estrada, a community engagement specialist with the St. Paul Police Department, told them about his years working with Latino kids who needed help navigating the court system. One problem he noticed: very few Latino lawyers.

“If everybody here graduates and becomes a lawyer, you’re going to make my job really easy,” Estrada said.

Nineteen percent of the U.S. population is Latino, but only 5% of lawyers are, according to the American Bar Association. This camp aims to change those statistics, one high school freshman at a time.

The St. Paul–based camp is the brainchild of Jorge Saavedra F., an assistant Ramsey County attorney. In the summer, he is the camp director. He first ran the camp in 2016. After a six-year hiatus, it returned this year. Saavedra hopes it will become an annual event. The camp is funded primarily by the Minnesota Hispanic Bar Association endowment fund; students pay $20 for the weeklong camp.

Saavedra’s goal: to reach Latino kids at the beginning of high school so they understand how to begin preparing themselves for college, whether they become a lawyer or choose a different career path. The camp recruits students through teachers and counselors, aiming to find students with potential who

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Tire Nichols video release: Former Memphis cop never ‘crossed the lines that others crossed,’ lawyers argued

An attorney for former Memphis police officer, Desmond Mills Jr., who is charged with second-degree murder in the deadly arrest of Tyre Nichols, asserted Saturday his client never “crossed the lines that others crossed.”

“The videos released on January 27 have produced as many questions as they have answers,” attorney Blake Ballin said in a statement to Fox News. “Some of the questions that remain will require a focus on Desmond Mills’ individual actions.”

“We are confident that the questions of whether Desmond crossed the lines that others crossed and whether he committed the crimes charged will be answered with a resounding no,” Ballin said.

A view from a camera mounted above the intersection where Memphis police caught up with Tire Nichols, who died three days later.  authorities released footage of the deadly encounter between Nichols and police Friday.

A view from a camera mounted above the intersection where Memphis police caught up with Tire Nichols, who died three days later. authorities released footage of the deadly encounter between Nichols and police Friday.
(Memphis Police Department)

TYRE NICHOLS’ FAMILY LAWYER CRUMP BLAMES ‘POLICE CULTURE IN AMERICA’ FOR DEATH IN MEMPHIS

Ballin’s comments came following the Friday release of bodycam and streetlight footage that depicted the violent sequence of events in which a group of Memphis police officers repeatedly beat Nichols while he was restrained with his hands behind his back using batons, fists and repeated kicks as he lay on the ground.

At one point in the video officers could be seen holding Nichols upright while others exchanged blows to his head.

Nichols, who was pulled over for an alleged traffic stop, was also tasered and sprayed with pepper spray in an incident that took place three houses down from his mother’s house on Jan. 7.

He died three days later in hospital after succumbing to his injuries.

It is unclear what role Mills played in the botched arrest that has been decried as a “failing of basic humanity,” as several officers arrived after

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Texas attorney found dead days after being taken down by bar patrons in alleged attempted shooting of ex-girlfriend

A Texas attorney caught on video allegedly pulling out a gun and trying to shoot a former girlfriend at the bar where she worked before being tackled by two patrons was found dead Wednesday, days after being released on bail.

The Austin Police Department told Fox News Digital that officers found Gavin Rush dead around 4:25 pm after receiving a request to conduct a welfare check. A police spokesperson did not say how Rush died.

“The death is not considered suspicious and the investigation is still ongoing,” the department said.

Rush, 41, was arrested on Nov. 26 after storming into the Anderson Mill Pub in Austin with a gun to confront the woman who was working behind the bar, following a breakup, according to court records.

MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY WON’T RULE OUT RUNNING FOR OFFICE AFTER DECIDING AGAINST TEXAS GOVERNOR CAMPAIGN

Attorney Gavin Rush points a gun at his ex-girlfriend, who is working at a bar in Austin, Texas, before being tackled by two patrons.

Attorney Gavin Rush points a gun at his ex-girlfriend, who is working at a bar in Austin, Texas, before being tackled by two patrons.
(Councilwoman Mackenzie Kelly)

He put a small leather satchel on the table and asked if he could speak with her, the police said.

“So you just aren’t going to talk to me,” he asked her, according to court documents.

When she replied “no,” Rush allegedly pulled a revolver out of the bag with an attached laser sight and centered it on her chest.

The security video of the incident shows two patrons, who are familiar with the couple and their breakup, lunging at Rush and tackling him to the floor. During the struggle, Rush placed the gun under his chin and tried to shoot himself, a police affidavit said.

One of the patrons said he was able to keep Rush’s finger off the trigger, police said. Rush fired at least three shots but no one was

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This is false, victorious accusation

Jeff Parras, the attorney for Matt Counts, said the Midland Police Department targeted the former Midland Christian School employees.

Parras said the MPD didn’t speak to many of the students who witnessed “the accident” and went after Counts, Jared Lee and Dana Ellis, even though there were others including school nurses, staff at a medical clinic and teachers who would have had the same duty to report it.

“They thought it was an accident,” Parras said. “They charged the three who are suing the city.

Counts, Lee and Ellis were indicated this week for a failure to make a required child abuse report.

Here is Parras’ statement to the Reporter-Telegram in its entirety.

“Earlier today I was notified that my client, Matthew Counts, had again been charged with an offense initiated by the Midland Police Department. We were recently made aware that the MPD was once again seeking to charge him, the most recent false accusation led by one of the same investigators whose prior false charges were dismissed in May. That prior false arrest was the subject of a federal lawsuit against the Midland Police Department and, among others, this same detective. We are extremely disappointed, though not entirely surprised, with the vindictive actions of the detectives, and equally disappointed that the leadership at MPD did not address the obvious conflict and assigned an unbiased investigator to review a case as shoddy, poorly investigated, and lacking as the newly filed one.

“The false allegation is that the accused failed to report and attempted to conceal child abuse, and concerns a teenage student in a Midland Christian School classroom being struck in the head accidentally last November, 2021. All those present who saw it have it as an accident, including the student himself. Accidents are specifically excluded

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District Attorney To Review All Cases Handled By Cop Who Planned Charlottesville Nazi Rally

A Massachusetts prosecutor has promised to review all cases handled by police Officer John Donnelly after a HuffPost report exposed Donnelly’s role in planning the deadly 2017 white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Middlesex County District Attorney Marina Ryan announced Friday that her office is now “thoroughly reviewing any pending or closed cases” in which Donnelly, a patrolman in Woburn, Massachusetts, was involved.

“We will be issuing a discovering notice disclosing this matter to defense counsel on those cases,” Ryan said in a statement. “That notice has already been added to our publicly available list of officers subject to exculpatory evidence disclosure.”

On Thursday, HuffPost published a report detailing how Donnelly, 33, was among hundreds of white supremacists who descended on Charlottesville in August 2017 for a “Unite the Right” rally, terrorizing the town while chanting slogans such as “Jews will not replace us” and violently attacking counterprotesters. The bloody weekend culminated with a neo-Nazi driving his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer.

Donnelly attended the rally as a bodyguard for Richard Spencer, a prominent white supremacist. Leaked chat logs from a neo-Nazi Discord server show Donnelly played an integral part in planning the weekend’s events.

The messages Donnelly posted on Discord show he may have belonged to the white supremacist group Identity Evropa. His messages were also full of racist and antisemitic slurs, and at times they advocated violence against leftists and minorities.

After attending the Charlottesville rally, Donnelly returned to Woburn, where he continued to be a police officer for the next five years.

HuffPost’s report was based on research by a collective of antifascist researchers called Ignite the Right.

“We are acutely aware of the way in which these allegations tear at the fabric of trust which exists between communities

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Ex-Nevada deputy attorney general arrested in teen’s 1972 murder in Hawaii

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A former Nevada deputy attorney general connected to the notorious Mustang Ranch brothel was arrested Wednesday for the slaying of a 19-year-old woman in Hawaii 50 years ago.

Tudor Chirila Jr., 77, was taken into custody in Reno for the gruesome stabbing murder of Nancy Anderson in a Waikiki apartment in Honolulu’s tourist hub on the island of Oahu.

Anderson had been stabbed more than 60 times and was found in her apartment in a pool of blood on Jan. 7, 1972.

MAINE FAMILY MISSING SINCE JUNE FOUND SAFE, ‘NO EVIDENCE OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR,’ POLICE SAY

Ex-Nevada Deputy AG Tudor Chirila Jr.  was arrested Wednesday for the 1972 cold case murder of Nancy Anderson.

Ex-Nevada Deputy AG Tudor Chirila Jr. was arrested Wednesday for the 1972 cold case murder of Nancy Anderson.
(Washoe County Sheriff’s Office/ Honolulu Police Department)

The young woman, who had just graduated from high school, moved to Hawaii from Michigan two months prior to her murder.

The case had been reopened numerous times over the decades — including a probe into a door-to-door knife salesmen who had knocked on Anderson’s apartment the day she died.

But it was DNA evidence that finally gave investigators their break in the case.

Nancy Anderson was found stabbed to death more than 60 times in 1972 in a Waikiki, Honolulu, apartment.  John Chirila Jr., 77, was arrested five decades after his DNA matched a sample left at the crime scene.

Nancy Anderson was found stabbed to death more than 60 times in 1972 in a Waikiki, Honolulu, apartment. John Chirila Jr., 77, was arrested five decades after his DNA matched a sample left at the crime scene.
(Honolulu Police Department)

Police obtained a DNA sample from the suspect’s son, John Chirila, in March, which confirmed that he was the biological child of a man whose DNA sample was found at the crime scene.

NEW YORK MAN ACCUSED OF WIFE’S COLD-CASE AX MURDER 37 YEARS LATER

Reno police used a search warrant to compel a DNA sample from Tudor Chirila on Sept. 6 in Reno. Two

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Attorney hopes civil rights charges will change how Grand Rapids police interact with Black people

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – An attorney representing the family of Honestie Hodges hopes civil rights discrimination charges against the Grand Rapids Police Department changes the way officers interact with Black people.

Stephen Drew, speaking to reporters flanked by Honestie’s mother and grandmother, said the Hodges family is hopeful the formal charges filed by the Michigan Department of Civil Rights will prompt serious and significant change — “not just policy, but the implementation of actions on the street.”

“I would like to see some serious, real community policing, where police become a real part of the community and not an occupation force, where they have relationships with people, where they do, honestly, investigate crime and help with that, but as persons and people,” Drew said.

Drew spoke with reporters Monday, July 25, after a press conference in which officials with Michigan’s civil rights watchdog department announced discrimination charges against the Grand Rapids Police Department stemming from two complaints.

MDCR issued charges of unequal treatment in public service on the basis of race against the GRPD in the December 2017 gunpoint handcuffing of 11-year-old Honestie and the January 2020 detainment of a compliant Black motorist.

Related: Grand Rapids police discriminated against 11-year-old and Black motorist, civil rights watchdog says

MDCR Executive Director John E. Johnson Jr. said Monday that Grand Rapids police were unable to show that people of another race in similar situations would have been treated the same.

In addition to Honestie’s family, Drew is representing the family of two boys who in August 2018 were 11 years old when Grand Rapids police ordered them, along with a 17-year-old male, to walk backward at gunpoint before they were handcuffed and searched for weapons. No weapons were found.

Police had responded to reports of two Black teens with a handgun when

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