aid society

EvictionFreeMKE.org offers free legal help to those on verge of losing their rented homes

A screenshot of the automated EvictionFreeMKE.org tool.

A screenshot of the automated EvictionFreeMKE.org tool.

A new tool, EvictionFreeMKE.orgis offering Milwaukee residents the opportunity to connect with free legal help, rental assistance and other resources to reduce evictions.

The new tool comes months after Milwaukee County Executive David Crowley signed a historic bill that established a Right to Counsel program in Milwaukee County.

RELATED: Milwaukee County has established a Right to Counsel program. Here’s why advocates say it could reduce evictions

That program provides residents facing eviction the right to a free lawyer. This new tool helps connect people with those lawyers.

Partners involved in creation of the tool include United Way of Greater Milwaukee & Waukesha County, Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee, Legal Action of Wisconsinthe City of Milwaukee and Milwaukee County.

The tool is part of the United Way’s Safe and Stable Homes initiative, said Krystina Kohler, a financial stability portfolio manager at United Way. The initiative is meant to end family homelessness in the four counties — Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Waukesha and Washington — served by the organization.

A lack of legal representation has been a regular feature of Milwaukee’s eviction courts, Matthew Desmond highlighted in his 2016 book “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.” His research found that only 3% of tenants appearing in eviction court had legal representation.

RELATED: The ‘Evicted’ exhibit brings awareness to Milwaukee, where the author hopes to continue the conversation

Kohler said he is hoping the three-year pilot will help reduce the 13,000 annual eviction filings that occur in Milwaukee.

“We found that when we provided free lawyers to tenants, their eviction cases were dismissed or delayed in about 90% of cases in Milwaukee,” Kohler said.

Kohler also noted that sometimes landlords won’t even attempt mediation and instead, go straight to filing

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1,000 Legal Aid workers in New York City hold walkout in contract struggle

Legal Aid and Legal Services workers, please contact us and tell us about your working conditions, what you think about the Legal Aid contract struggle and socialist Will Lehman’s exposure and challenge to the UAW union election.

New York Legal Aid attorneys protest (New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO Facebook) [Photo: New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO Facebook]

One thousand Association of Legal Aid Attorneys conducted a one-hour strike and informational picket for a new contract last week on Wednesday, February 8. They chanted “two percent won’t pay the rent” during lunch-hour pickets at Legal Aid Society offices in all five boroughs of New York City. The Legal Aid Society is a non-profit corporation operating in New York City, funded mostly by the city and state with some private donations. Among their responsibilities, legal aid lawyers and support staff are responsible for providing legal representation to lower-income tenants facing evictions who are employed by the Legal Aid Society and Legal Services, nonprofit corporations that contract with the city to provide these services.

This followed a strike authorization vote of 92 percent, with 93 percent of the eligible membership voting, announced by UAW Local 2325 on January 23. Local 2325 represents civil and public defenders employed by the Legal Aid Society. Their previous contract expired last summer.

The overwhelming strike vote was announced two days before negotiations with Legal Aid were set to begin. During the negotiations, Legal Aid proposed a derisory 2 percent wage increase amid soaring inflation and cost-of-living increases in one of the most expensive cities in the world. In the face of overwhelming strike authorization by the members, the UAW 2325 leadership rejected the insulting offer and called for the one-hour strike on Wednesday.

The strike announcement on February 6 stated the action was being

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The Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee relocates office to Hatcher Lane in Columbia

The Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands announced the opening of its relocated Columbia office at 1503 Hatcher Lane, Suite 105.

The Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands announced the opening of its relocated Columbia office at 1503 Hatcher Lane, Suite 105.

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands, Tennessee’s largest nonprofit law firm, announced today the opening of its relocated Columbia office at 1503 Hatcher Lane, Suite 105.

The Columbia office’s attorneys and legal services will continue unchanged in the new location, although additional staff may be joining in the near future. Previously, the office had been located at 1121 Trotwood Ave., Ste. 4.

“The Legal Aid Society is proud to have been a part of the Columbia community for more than 40 years,” said Patricia Jones, lead attorney of the Columbia office. “In this new location, which is just a short drive away from our old offices, we will continue to provide needed free legal services to low-income residents of Columbia and the surrounding area.”

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands advocates for fairness and justice under the law. The nonprofit law firm offers free civil legal representation and educational programs to help people in its region receive justice, protect their well-being and support opportunities to overcome poverty. It serves 48 counties from offices in Clarksville, Columbia, Cookeville, Gallatin, Murfreesboro, Nashville, Oak Ridge and Tullahoma. The Legal Aid Society is funded in part by the United Way. Learn more at www.las.org or by following the firm on Facebook.

This article originally appeared on The Daily Herald: Legal Aid of Middle TN relocates office to Hatcher Lane in Columbia

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The Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee relocates office to Hatcher Lane in Columbia

The Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands announced the opening of its relocated Columbia office at 1503 Hatcher Lane, Suite 105.

The Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands announced the opening of its relocated Columbia office at 1503 Hatcher Lane, Suite 105.

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands, Tennessee’s largest nonprofit law firm, announced today the opening of its relocated Columbia office at 1503 Hatcher Lane, Suite 105.

The Columbia office’s attorneys and legal services will continue unchanged in the new location, although additional staff may be joining in the near future. Previously, the office had been located at 1121 Trotwood Ave., Ste. 4.

“The Legal Aid Society is proud to have been a part of the Columbia community for more than 40 years,” said Patricia Jones, lead attorney of the Columbia office. “In this new location, which is just a short drive away from our old offices, we will continue to provide needed free legal services to low-income residents of Columbia and the surrounding area.”

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands advocates for fairness and justice under the law. The nonprofit law firm offers free civil legal representation and educational programs to help people in its region receive justice, protect their well-being and support opportunities to overcome poverty. It serves 48 counties from offices in Clarksville, Columbia, Cookeville, Gallatin, Murfreesboro, Nashville, Oak Ridge and Tullahoma. The Legal Aid Society is funded in part by the United Way. Learn more at www.las.org or by following the firm on Facebook.

This article originally appeared on The Daily Herald: Legal Aid of Middle TN relocates office to Hatcher Lane in Columbia

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NYC paid out more money in 2022 to settle police misconduct lawsuits than in past 5 years

According to a new analysis from the Legal Aid Society, the city of New York paid out more money to settle police misconduct lawsuits in 2022 than they did in the last five years.

The city paid over $121 million to settle lawsuits against the NYPD in 2022. While the number of lawsuits settled on behalf of the NYPD has declined steadily in the last five years, the payouts have increased.

Several payouts were made in police misconduct cases towards protesters following the death of George Floyd in 2020, according to the Legal Aid Society’s analysis.

In the wake of Tire Nichols’ fatal beating by Memphis police, the Legal Aid Society is calling on the mayor and the NYPD commissioner to hold its officers accountable on top of settling lawsuits.

“We see that in many cases where there are large payouts… just no discipline, or at most a slap on the wrist,” said Molly Griffard of the Legal Aid Society.

The NYPD respondents with the following statement:

“While the decision to settle a lawsuit, and for how much, remains with the Law Department and the Comptroller — the NYPD actively seeks out information learned from these lawsuits in order to improve officer performance and enhance training or policy, where necessary.”

The Legal Aid Society says it is concerned that the current system is sending a message to NYPD officers that their misconduct will be tolerated.

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The Legal Aid Society urges major to be transparent about evidence lost in the NYPD warehouse fire

The Legal Aid Society wants Major Eric Adams to be clear about what was lost when a fire damaged an NYPD warehouse in Brooklyn.

The group is concerned that when the warehouse that stored decades of DNA evidence in Red Hook went up in flames earlier this month, it may have changed the fate of those who were wrongfully convicted.

Elizabeth Felber, with the Legal Aid Society, says DNA is the gold standard for evidence and criminal justice and that is why this fire is detrimental to the system’s flow.

This is why the group has penned a letter to the major to be more transparent.

“We want an accounting of what was destroyed. We want to know every single item that was in that facility…whether it is still in any kind of condition to be tested, which seems unlikely. What clients do those items correspond to, whose cases were affected by this fire,” Felber says.

She adds that the Legal Aid Society also wants a committee that includes those who have been wrongfully convicted, public defenders, district attorney offices, the mayor and NYPD to come up with a plan to make sure DNA evidence is more secure in the future.

“Why aren’t they doing a better job? Why is the building so rundown and ram shackled? Why are they storing e-bikes, which I hear is a huge fire hazard? So there has to be accountability on how they can do it better and must do it better,” Felber says.

She said the fire made her job much harder when her clients were wrongly proven but not impossible.

“We will have to come up with a remedy and perhaps persuade the different DA’s offices to agree to at

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Lillian Moy, lawyer and ‘do-gooder’, looks back on 27 years at Legal Aid Society in Albany

ALBANY – In 1995, when Lillian Moy became executive director of the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York, the job she would hold for the next 27 years, nonprofit law firms that provided civil legal services for the poor were hardly major political players.

By Moy’s second year, their funding was on the chopping block in Congress.

“One of my friends said that year that the only thing less popular in Washington DC than a poor person was a poor person with a lawyer,” Moy said recently.

In more than a quarter-century since that time, Moy led the society to expand its services to litigants, its level of financial and volunteer support from law firms and its coverage area from six upstate counties to 16. After 27 years, Moy will retire on Dec. 16, capping a career that’s brought much-needed legal representation for the underserved, as well as accolades from some of the highest-profile legal minds in Albany and beyond.

“Her passion, perversion, and tireless pursuit of justice are inspiring. We could not have asked for a better leader,” James Hacker, a managing partner in the firm of E. Stewart Jones Hacker Murphy and the chair of the society’s board of directors , said at a gala celebration in Moy’s honor at the Albany Capital Center on Nov. 9.

“Lillian has been a driving force in increasing access to justice to meet the needs of our low-income communities,” Hacker said. “Her work has helped tens of thousands of families and individuals access the legal services they need to help with unemployment, homelessness prevention, education, disability, and hundreds of other civil legal matters.”

Moy, who graduated from Hunter College in 1974 and Boston University School of Law in 1981, found her niche in a critical area of ​​the law that

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NYC Legal Aid Society to ask feds to take over the city’s troubled jails

New York City’s largest legal aid nonprofit is slim up its efforts for a federal takeover of the Big Apple’s troubled jail system — as violence at the hands of corrections officers spiked to the highest levels since 2016.

The Legal Aid Society intends to formally ask Manhattan federal Judge Laura Swain to order a receivership of Rikers Island and other city Department of Correction facilities on Dec. 15, argued it was clear from a recent monitor report that the feds needed to step in.

The report, which was released late last month, found that the use-of-force rate this year was more than double what it was six years ago — 10.24 per 100 inmates versus 3.96 in 2016 — when the city agreed to a consent decree to reduce the excessive violence by officers.

“The consent judgment was entered more than seven years ago, and to date, the City has not substantially complied with the core provisions of that judgment and the four remedial orders that followed,” Kayla Simpson, staff attorney with the Prisoners’ Rights Project at The Legal Aid Society, said in a statement.

An NYC Department of Corrections vehicle leaves the Rikers Island facility in Queens, in New York, US, February 14, 2018.
The Legal Aid Society hopes to receive Department of Correction facilities in December.
REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

“The violence in the city jails is worse today than at the outset of the lawsuit because the City has persistently failed to follow court orders and protect the people in its custody. We can wait no longer.”

The letter, filed in federal court Monday, says the nonprofit will file its request for an outside agency to run the city jails on Dec. 15, the earliest date the lawyers previously agreed it could be filed.

“[T]he Monitor cited the prevalence of ‘avoidable, unnecessary and excessive uses of force,’ and the astonishing number of use of force incidents that occur

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Judge nixes Legal Aid Society’s bid to have feds take over Rikers Island

A Manhattan federal judge dealt a blow to advocates for Rikers Island prisoners on Thursday, barring the Legal Aid Society from requesting a federal takeover of the Big Apple’s troubled jail system.

Judge Laura Taylor shot down a request from the city’s largest legal aid nonprofit that it be allowed to formally lobby for the appointment of a “receiver” — or third-party administrator — to oversee Rikers Island and other city Department of Correction facilities.

While Swain said she remains deeply concerned about safety issues at Rikers, the promise of a receiver could divert resources away from keeping inmates safe and could be counter productive, she noted.

Allowing Legal Aid to argue for the receivership would be “premature and inconsistent with the legal restraints,” the judge added at the end of the lengthy hearing on Thursday.

The Legal Aid Society was hoping to lobby for a third-party to step in and oversee the Department of Corrections.
A federal judge axed the Legal Aid Society’s petition for the feds to manage Rikers.
AFP via Getty Images

Legal Aid attorney Mary Lynne Werl was had pleaded with Swain to consider the group’s argument for a receiver, arguing that seven years had passed since a federal monitor was appointed to institute reforms at the jail.

“Continuing down the same path cannot and will not bring relief to the plaintiff class,” Werlwas, who represents prisoners at the jail complex, told the judge.

The attorney cited a litany of concerns, including use of force by staff, chronic absenteeism and the inability of guards to stop inmate suicides.

There has been a sharp uptick in Rikers <a href=inmate suicides in 2022. ” class=”wp-image-24700569″ srcset=”https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/11/judge-nixes-rikers-receivership-893.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535 1536w, https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/11/judge-nixes-rikers-receivership-893.jpg?quality=75&strip=all 1024w, https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/11/judge-nixes-rikers-receivership-893.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=512 512w” sizes=”(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px”/
The attorney cited use of force by staff, chronic absenteeism and the inability of guards to stop inmate suicides.
Corbis via Getty Images

The crisis in the city jails — where 18 people have died this year — has persisted throughout a

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